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Martin Wittfooth Edition


MARTIN WITTFOOTH


Announcing a small-run handcrafted edition
of twenty-five intaglio prints by Martin Wittfooth.

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Martin Wittfooth Edition


MARTIN WITTFOOTH


Announcing a small-run handcrafted edition
of twenty-five intaglio prints by Martin Wittfooth.


Martin Wittfooth / Nocturne

Inky Pulp announces it's inauguration print edition through a collaboration with celebrated Contemporary artist Martin Wittfooth. Working with our master printmakers to combine photogravureaquatinting, and drypoint techniques, the artist has created a small-run, hand-crafted intaglio edition based on his painting titled Nocturne.

 

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Wittfooth Print Production


Wittfooth Print Production


 
 

Nocturne is a limited edition of twenty-five prints by Martin Wittfooth, which combines 19th Century intaglio techniques. Each print has been impressed onto 300gsm Somerset Soft White paper using Charbonnel inks and come signed and numbered by the artist.

 
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Wittfooth Print Sale


Wittfooth Print Sale


 

Martin Wittfooth
Nocturne, 2017

Edition of 25 prints
2 Artist Proofs
2 Printers Proof
1 Bon à Tirer
Paper size: 22 1/4 × 26 inches
Plate size: 16 3/4 × 20 7/8 inches
Intaglio printed
Signed and numbered by the artist

 
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Martin Wittfooth Artist


Martin Wittfooth Artist


 

MARTIN WITTFOOTH

After attending the School of Visual Arts in New York, Wittfooth received his MFA from Sheridan College in Toronto. Since then he has created a series of fantastic solo exhibitions across the country with Copro Gallery in Santa Monica, Johnathan Levine Gallery in New York, and Corey Helford Gallery in Los Angeles. He has participated in dozens of group shows and his work has been featured in Hi Fructose, Juxtapoz, the New York Times, and the Wall Street Journal, among others.

 

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“Everywhere and at all times, we’ve been busy making things in our present for the simple purpose of communicating something, and thus sending messages into our future. What a peculiar habit. We’re the only species inhabiting this planet that routinely behaves this way, and there’s something really beautiful and profound about that.”

Martin Wittfooth